Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Without anxiety

Let us learn to keep a perfectly even temper,
so important to our spiritual life, and
a harmonious state of mind so that
we may face all situations without anxiety.

St. Joseph Marello

St. Cyril of Alexandria

Cyril was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 376, and was the nephew of Theophilus, the patriarch of the city. When his uncle died in 412, Cyril took his position on the see of Alexandria.  He soon began a series of attacks against the Novatians, a religion started by the antipope Novatian. He closed their churches and drove Jews from the city.

In 428, Cyril discovered that the priest/monk Nestorius, the Archbishop of Alexandria, was preaching heretical theology. Cyril sent the heretic a mild expostulation, but to no avail. Both parties then appealed to Pope St. Clementine, and Cyril was appointed to depose Nestorius. In 431, Cyril presided over the Third General Council at Ephesus, attended by some two hundred bishops, which condemned all the tenets of Nestorius and his followers. However, upon the arrival of Archbishop John of Antioch and forty-two followers who believed Nestorius to be innocent, they held a council of their own and deposed Cyril. Emperor Theodosius II had both Cyril and Nestorius arrested but released Cyril on the arrival of papal legates who confirmed the council's actions against Nestorius and declared Cyril innocent of all charges leveled against him.

Two years later, Archbishop John, representing the moderate Antiochene bishops, and Cyril reached an agreement and issued a joint condemnation, and Nestorius was forced into exile.

Cyril died in 444 at Antioch. He was named a Doctor of the Church in 1882.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Family Tips: Enrollment of the Sacred Heart of Jesus as King in Your Home



“To restore all things in Christ” ~ Saint Pius X

This devotion was introduced to the world by Fr. Mateo Crawley-Boevey with approval of several popes such as St. Pius X, Benedict XV and Pius XI. Fr. Mateo, a priest from Chile traveled the world including the United States in 1940.

Benefits of this devotion
Our Lord’s promises:
1)   “I will bless every place where an image of My Heart shall be exposed and honored.”
2)   “I will give them all the graces necessary for their state in life.”
3)   “I will establish peace in their families.”
4)   “I will comfort them in their trials.”
*The above promises were taken from the 12 promises made by Our Lord to St. Margaret Mary Alocoque in 1673.

How to make it happen:
1)   Obtain a beautiful picture or statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
2)   Ask your priest to come to enthrone the Sacred Heart in your home.
Note: In the event a priest is not available, there may be a lay member or “promoter” in charge of this apostolate in your parish. Even the father or mother of the house may lead the prayers in this simple, yet powerful, ceremony.
3)   If possible, make this a special occasion by inviting some of your friends and family.
      This will help others pick up the same idea for their own homes.
4)   Print up the prayers for the participants to follow. (click here for prayers)
5)   Prepare some refreshments for after the Enthronement ceremony.

The ceremony
The steps in the ceremony are:
1)   An opening hymn or prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus;
2)   An explanation of the meaning of the Enthronement;
3)   The blessing of the image or statue of the Sacred Heart by the priest;
4)   Placement of the image of the Sacred Heart in a place of honor in the home;
5)   The Act of Consecration to the Sacred Heart;
6)   A closing hymn (optional).



 

Heaven on earth

God is as really present in the consecrated Host
as He is
in the glory of Heaven.

St. Paschal Baylon

St. Anthelm of Belley

Anthelm was born in 1107 near Chambéry, France. He was a good and generous man, but more materialistic than a priest ought to be. His eyes being opened to this spiritual defect while visiting the Charterhouse of Portes, he underwent an interior conversion. Requesting admission to the order, he was vested in the habit of St. Bruno in 1137.

Only two years after joining the order, he became the seventh Prior of the Grande Chartreuse. His growing reputation for wisdom and holiness attracted many to the order, including his own father and brother.

The salutary effect of his influence was also felt during the Schism of 1159 when western Christendom was divided. One group favored the claims of the true pope, Alexander III, the other supported the antipope, "Victor IV.” His work for the papal cause gained him the bishopric of Belley, though the holy man longed for nothing more than a monastic cell.  He fervently, even tearfully, pleaded with the Pope not to appoint him bishop, but to no avail, and in 1163, he was consecrated bishop over the diocese of Belley.

Until his death in 1178 at the age of seventy-two, Anthelm fearlessly reprimanded the clergy for their fallen standards concerning priestly celibacy and labored tirelessly and uncompromisingly for the reform of the clergy.

Sunday, June 25, 2017

A Young Man and His Lady Love

In twelfth century England, a group of young men had gathered and were bragging of their various feats, as young men have done since the beginning of time.
The lively conversation went from archery to sword fighting to horsemanship, each trying to outdo the accomplishments of the others.
Finally, the young men began to boast of some foolish love affairs. Not to be outdone by his peers, a noble youth named Thomas declared that he, too, loved a great lady, and was beloved by her.
Thomas of Canterbury meant the most holy Virgin as the object of his affection, but afterwards, he felt some remorse at having made this boast. He did not want to offend his beloved Lady in any way.
Seeing all from her throne in heaven, Mary appeared to him in his trouble, and with a gracious sweetness said to him: "Thomas, what do you fear? You had reason to say that you loved me, and that you are beloved by me. Assure your companions of this, and as a pledge of the love I bear you, show them this gift that I make you."
The gift was a small box, containing a chasuble, blood-red in color. Mary, for the love she bore him, had obtained for him the grace to be a priest and a martyr, which indeed happened, for he was first made priest and afterwards Bishop of Canterbury, in England.
Many years later, he would indeed be persecuted by the king, and Thomas fled to the Cistercian monastery at Pontignac, in France.
Far from kith and kin, but never far from his Lady Love, he was attempting to mend his hair-cloth shirt that he usually wore and had ripped. Not being able to do it well, his beloved queen appeared to him, and, with special kindness, took the haircloth from his hand, and repaired it as it should be done.
After this, at the age of 50, he returned to Canterbury and died a martyr, having been put to death on account of his zeal for the Church.
From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

Always

Charity requires us always
to have compassion
on human infirmity.

St. Catherine of Siena